Archive: Unable to patch Windows 8.1 in Audit Mode? Use Powershell

windows_symbol_clr_56x56I like to use Audit Mode for all of my Windows image builds. It’s clean, doesn’t create necessary accounts, and specifically exists for capturing images. I’ve used this in Windows 7 for years.

Windows 8 also has an Audit Mode that works in the same way. When you get prompted to customize your desktop and create an account after installing Windows, you simply hit CONTROL-SHIFT-F3 at the same time. It immediately reboots into Audit mode where it uses the local admin account and a generated password automatically. Perfect.

However; there’s one big problem using Audit Mode in Windows 8 – Windows Update simply will not run. I don’t know the entire technical explanation behind it, but it will just search for hours and never find any updates. Big problem.

The fix? Use this simple PowerShell module to grab all Windows Updates instead.

Once you’ve downloaded that zip file, extract the folder inside %WINDIR%\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\Modules . This adds it to the available PowerShell modules.

Now, launch a PowerShell console.

If you haven’t changed your execution policy to allow remotely signed scripts on the local system yet, do that with this command: Set-ExecutionPolicy RemoteSigned

Now, import the module: Import-Module PSWindowsUpdate

Finally, run this command to automate the installation of all available updates: Get-WUInstall

I’d recommend running this and rebooting several times to make sure that you’re fully patched.

Of course, the downfall of this command is that it install all updates. You can always remove any updates you don’t afterwards. I see this as a much better alternative than not patching it at all, especially when Windows 8.1 Update weighs in around 900MB.

3 thoughts on “Archive: Unable to patch Windows 8.1 in Audit Mode? Use Powershell”

  1. Hello Josh, thanks for this info. One question, when you say this method installs all updates, does this include all recommended updates as well? I want only the important and none of the recommended updates.
    Thanks!

  2. Pingback: Best Practices to Capture an Image for Deployment - JoshHeffner.com

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